Legal mistakes that many young people make

Young people lack life experience and fully formed brains, so it is natural that some would make some legal mistakes such as underage drinking.

People of all ages in Colorado are susceptible to making mistakes; however, it does seem that young people may make more than their share of blunders. This could be because a person's brain is not finished developing until age 25. It could also be because young people lack some life experience. Whatever the case is, quite a few young people do find themselves in legal trouble. Here is a look at the common mistakes they may have made.

DUI/DWAI

Perhaps the most common legal mistake has to do with drinking and driving. Just because a person feels fine to drive or just because they are traveling a short distance does not mean they can't find themselves in trouble for Driving Under the Influence or Driving While Ability Impaired. A blood alcohol content of .05 or greater will leave a person facing drinking and driving charges that can have long lasting effects on one's employment, education, and salary prospects.

Assault/Harassment

There are many circumstances in a young person's life when they are not looking for trouble, but trouble finds them. Downtown Fort Collins and college parties are areas in which alcohol is sometimes consumed in excess and when that occurs tempers can run high. Felony assault charges can land an individual in prison for up to 32 years and misdemeanor assault charges carry a possible penalty of up to 2 years in the county jail. With consequences this severe, hiring competent and experienced defense counsel is a necessity.

Drug use

Many young people experiment with drugs for the first time in high school and college. Experimentation can lead to behaviors that are criminal in nature; especially if those behaviors happen within a college dormitory. Drug charges can have serious consequences and also lead to expulsion from high school or college.

No matter the crime in question, a conviction stands to have grave, long-lasting consequences. An attorney can serve as an advocate throughout the process, mitigate damages, and hopefully provide an outcome that will not result in a permanent conviction.